Whole Person Transformation

•December 28, 2014 • Leave a Comment

http://holographicarchetypes.weebly.com/groupthink.htmlthirdeye

Individual consciousness is only the flower and the fruit of a season, sprung from the perennial rhizome beneath the earth; and it would find itself in better accord with the truth if it took the existence of the rhizome into its calculations. For the root matter is the mother of all things.” — C.G. Jung, Symbols of Transformation
Whole Person Transformation

A perennial theme of humankind, transformation as a basic change in character, cognition, and direction has been explored in religion, psychology and art. Rites of passage, as a summons to wisdom, can include a psychological and sacred dimension. It addresses the question of how a person finds a personal path worthy of the soul. We’re taught to strive for this mythic “thing” at the physical, mental, and spiritual level. Transformation is thorough, radical and dramatic — a power that can be deployed for good or ill.

Classically, ‘transformation’ describes the path from initiation to liberation from social conformity, helping us let go of the worn out to find deep dialogue with psyche, adventure and renewed life. The process is mediated by symbols and imagery. If they arise organically ego is transformed; if they are imposed ego is hijacked. Solitude is the furnace of authentic transformation. Personal growth is an individual process of self-determination. In this sense, it is incompatible with group programming. But the real self as divergent perceptions and dynamic understanding of interrelationships is dangerous to tradition, the church, the state, and the crowd.

In psychology, transformation has been curiously defined as “the procedure used when unconscious desires or urges are costumed in order to emerge in consciousness.” Psychobiological transformation is a key theme in depth psychologies. It begins at the point where there is no hope and lead through overwhelming challenges, fraught with depression, fragmentation, resistance, symptoms, pain and anxiety. We are at our most vulnerable at the threshold of transformation.

The key to personal transformation is story transformation. It is symbolic, life-changing — a massive reorganization of attitudes, behaviors, and meaning. Metamorphosis is the classic metaphor of major life passages and restructuring. Latent potentials emerge and outworn characteristics decline. Some qualities are hidden until our true nature is revealed as a new form of life and self-identity.

Imaginal psychology urges us to move beyond the monotheistic myth of self-domination by the abstract concepts of a rational heroic ego, self, or god. James Hillman noted the ego too is an image. It makes problems to solve them with will and intentionality, but that is an illusory perspective. Consciousness is not based on concepts of ego or self, though it has been identified as such. Archetypes generate the transformational images and the universal material of myth and drama, but they bear the mark of personal and cultural conditioning. They provide archaic and timeless meaning.

Hillman dubs ego a “myth of inflation”, not the secret key to the development of consciousness, but a source of fallacies, defining its literal fantasies as reality. In A Blue Fire (pg. 34), he suggests, “placing in abeyance such metaphors as: choice and light, problem solving and reality testing, strengthening, developing, controlling, progressing.” He condemns new age insistence on transformation – sloughing off the old self and interpretive schemes for an idealization that is essentially another self-delusion.

Jung (CW 12, par. 32) cautioned that we must be alone to find out what it is that supports us when we can no longer support ourselves. Only this experience, he said, gives us an indestructible foundation. “Individuation and collectivity are a pair of opposites, two divergent destinies. They are related to one another by guilt.” He concludes, “we must be able to stand alone vis a vis the unconscious for better or worse.” (Letters, Vol 1, p. 458-459) Jung also notes, “Individuation is just ordinary life and what you are made conscious of.” (Letters, Vol. 1, pg. 442) It isn’t rare, but it is a move toward self-actualization or self-realization.

The path from the oblivious to self-aware life is beset with obstacles. How do we know what a genuine transformative experience is? We transform ourselves by every act of self-knowing. Jung felt that self-realization was a natural process of transformation, orchestrated by the unconscious. The infinite depth of dynamic reality informs our worldview and personal sovereignty. Such is the journey of meaningful solitude into silence, ratified by the perennial wisdom.

Krishnamurti said, “To stand alone is to be uncorrupted, innocent, free of all tradition, of dogma, of opinion, of what another says, and so on. . . .What matters is to understand for oneself, not through the direction of others, the total content of consciousness, which is not conditioned, which is the result of society, of religion, of various impacts, impressions, memories — to understand all of that conditioning and be free of it. But there is no “how” to be free. If you ask ‘how’ to be free, you are not listening.”

Kahlil Gibran claimed, “Knowledge of the self is the mother of all knowledge. So it is incumbent on me to know my self, to know it completely, to know its minutiae, its characteristics, its subtleties, and its very atoms.” Yogananda suggests that self-realization is “to know truth through yourself, and not through others.” Ramana Maharshi says, “your own Self-Realization is the greatest service you can render the world.”

The Dalai Lama says, “With realization of one’s own potential and self-confidence in one’s ability, one can build a better world.” Rumi was poetic: “I have been a seeker and I still am, but I stopped asking the books and the stars. I started listening to the teaching of my Soul.” Hermann Hesse and others, such as Thoreau, Emerson and Whitman, echo this approach in their own writings.

Hesse felt that, “We must become so alone, so absolutely alone, that we withdraw into our innermost self. It is a way of bitter suffering. But then our solitude is overcome, we are no longer alone, for we find that our innermost self is the spirit, that it is God, the indivisible. And suddenly we find ourselves in the midst of the world, yet undisturbed by its multiplicity, for in our innermost soul, we know ourselves to be one with all beings.”

“Transformation connotes a more-or-less dramatic shift in the context of an individual’s meaning system, beyond any attempts to re-brand or commercialize the field. Real transformation takes place in the furnace of the heart. However, institutional transformation can mean an imposed or enforced social change. In McLuhan’s vernacular, the “invisible” environment of new technologies creates an “erosion”, not enhancement, of the conscious and unconscious — by means of “audience as workforce.” We unconsciously conform to such environments. The subconscious works on emotion. Business strategy is transformed into emotion.

Transformation is a model of a process. In this theory, personal and social transformation promotes self-actualization and compassionate service. Radical change involves new habits, range of emotions, and worldview — concerns, interests, goals, ambitions, and behaviors. A reordering of values can change the basis of self-identity. Significant transformation can mean a radical reorganization of one’s identity, meaning, and purpose in life — a turning point — transformations of earlier worldviews. Embodied transformation sustains over time. Wisdom to know the difference between one’s ego and one’s Self is embodied in your individuality.

Or, does holistic repatterning just mean structural transformation of old elements into a new configuration in the internal landscape — a restructuring of psychic space? Only a profound change in structure creates something new. Infiltrated consciousness is such a result, changing how we perceive the world and act on those perceptions.

Organizational strategies and state or corporate coercive transformation don’t serve the individual. For them, imposed transformation means collaborative, consultative, directive and coercive manipulations. Ultimately, it means international competition and state formation. The state exerts coercion for control.

Iona Miller Frontier Science Articles

•September 18, 2014 • 1 Comment

http://holographicarchetypes.weebly.com/articles.html

Frontier Science

Enlightening Holograms

Published Articles Log
Holographic Archetypes
Science-Art, Chaos, Coincidence, Creation

Iona Miller

Quantum Brain-Mind Problem Examined

•September 18, 2014 • Leave a Comment
http://scigod.com/index.php/sgj/article/view/303/350
On the Quantum Aspects of Brain-Mind Problem
Iona Miller 2014
Abstract
The brain-mind problem is also known as the mind-body problem and by extension mind-matter. How the mind relates to the brain has classically been discussed in terms of monism and dualism-that the mind and brain are one or that the mind and brain are separate. It has long been suggested that the brain functions as a sort of transducer from the universal to the particular. Quantum and sub -quantal phenomena may play an important part in the brain’s transducer function
.Further, our physical theories and narratives , rooted in philosophical notions about the interface of psyche and matter , also serve a symbolic function If the unconscious is a magical powerhouse that speaks in symbols, our notion of the unconscious is also a symbol of the power of the primal field.

On the Trail of the Grail

•September 16, 2014 • Leave a Comment

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Finding Deeper Meaning in Genealogy
Ancestors, Legends, & Myths
Iona Miller, 2014

The ancestors are, of course, the archetypes — they are the psychological ancestors. In a really dangerous situation they may be quite real. –Jung

Today we have great difficulty with ancestors. We do not know what they are or how to enable them. Yet establishing a harmonious relation with these ancestors is crucial to our symbolic life. These
figures came long before us and will outlive us. Giving the ancestors that people our psyche the recognition they need is the only way their blessings can flow.

We can participate with the same living unconscious that was revered by our ancestors. Genealogy offers a way to connect with the deep, imaginal spirituality of our ancestors without appropriating from other cultures or crafting a new spirituality. We can reconnect to ancestors that trace their roots through our bloodlines.

The co-creative process of soul-making takes us out of our “only personal” ancestry and empowers the Ancestors. We break through the boundaries that separate our inner and outer lives. They create synchronistic fields around us that continually generate and store symbolic awareness. The seed of life conceals the geometry of creation. Imagination has its own way of knowing.

Experience of Ancestors as opposed to ancestry is central to the symbolic life and the transformation of cultural images, ideals and institutions. Genealogy helps us free ourselves from our primitive ancestors’ psychological enmeshment by giving form to their countless typical experiences. Our world is ‘haunted’ by the absence-presence of the ancestors. Rituals of our ancestors paid homage to the afterlife. Our ancestors also rest in the sacred landscapes of the psyche, not only in specific geographies. Psyche is not of today, but extends back many millions of years.

My Generation
In psychology, an archetype is the innate knowledge, images, or ways of thinking that are inherited from ancestors. During significant events (birth, death, disaster) human behavior takes on a typical form. In the archetype concept we mirror the emotions of our remote ancestors in how we act and react in these significant situations.
These architects of dreams and symptom speak through divination, myth and ritual enactment, offering a hidden language suffused with a sort of pre-rational verbal therapy that produces real and effective changes within us.

Descent From Antiquity
Our ancient Pagan ancestors had their pantheons of Gods & Goddesses. The gods are transpersonal or spiritual ancestors, as our traditional lines of descent show.
Many claimed ancestries are considered by modern scholars to be fabrications, especially the claims of kings and emperors who trace their ancestry to gods or the founders of their civilization. Some genealogists now cut off what are labeled as fictious or legendary roots.
Genealogy, legend and political prophecies played a crucial role in constructing the past in the service of royal power. Many royals
traced their lineage not only to the pagan gods but also to the priest-kings of the Old Testament.

Genealogy has an evolutionary history of its own. What scholars term a “defect” in such lines may not be so psychologically. There is no harm and maybe psychological benefit to maintaining such ties, so long as they are not taken literally. They are part of our personal origin myth. Royal descents from mythical heroes include, Odin, Titans, Aphrodite, Zeus, Hercules, Isis, Adam and Eve, Mary Magdalene and Jesus, Muhammad, Tamar Tephi, Scota, Beli Mawr. King Arthur, and more.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity

Archetypes, ancestors and allies form our mythic self.  The knowledge, but also the sins and wounds of our ancestors live within us.  There is a deep longing inside each of us for something our ancestors received, but that is missing now — the information that connects us to the whole — a creative relation to the figures of the deep psyche that people our imagination. Genealogy helps us enter that symbolic life.

We forget that the soul has its own ancestors. Archetypes are directly knowable as a product of the shared experiences of our ancestors. We relive the soul of the ancestors as primordial psyche, inherited from common ancestors in the distant human past. We can receive guidance in the dreamtime from archetypal ancestors. We do not only carry the genes of our ancestors; we also carry their memories. Jung said, underneath the modern surface of the mind lurks the original primitive mentality of our ancestors, complete with vivid stories and symbols that have a natural appeal to us and seem to appear unbidden in our dreams and fantasies.

To conduct our own personal research and to find out for ourselves, maybe all we need to do is listen to our inner DNA. The unconscious comprises in itself the psychic life of our ancestors right back to the earliest beginnings. We can listen to the voices, feelings, sights and experiences of our ancestors. The land of the dead is the country of our ancestors and the images who walk in on us are our ancestors. They can be associated with the elements of nature. They exert their claim on us, and power over us — a sense of our internal fate — as psychic representations of our geographical, historical and cultural contexts.

We are under the influence of ancestors, archetypes, family and collective consequences. The achievement of consciousness by our distant ancestors is reflected in the hero or heroine’s journey. Active imagination isn’t new; our ancestors staring into the fire were exercising just this. The hero’s journey represents the primitive struggle of our ancestors in entering an unknown world of danger, but overcoming the danger and bringing back to the tribe or group some discovery or treasure that will benefit everyone.

Legacy of the Ancestors
Ancestors brings together genealogy, common mythological roots and psychology.
Our ancestors often use metaphors in order to make the issue clear. The “living serpents” of our descent lines can be used to invoke the ancestors. Genealogy is a form of veneration. The study of our ancestors is the study of the Tree of Life. An altar, for example, can honor your biological ancestors, the universal archetypal ancestors, or both.

The purpose of the totem meal, grail, or eucharist is to reunite the participants with the life of their ancestors. Their lives, joys and fears are within us. In this way, they are with us always. Our ancestors revered nature, but were also irrational and superstitious about it. We can still turn to nature for insight as our ancestors did for millennia. Most of us have lost touch with religious traditions of our ancestors;  we no longer connect with their sacred myths and metaphors. Genealogy is more direct, more personal.

Healing shifts occur through the conscious Feminine, Sophia, Wisdom, the divine feminine embodied in the world.  The exploits and mode of being of the great ancestors resonate, to a lesser degree, with our experience of dreaming.  The concealed and mysterious are as important as the revealed and understood. The ancestors are jealous; they want to be remembered. Remembering them is not just an empty custom, but imbued with meaning. The deeper meaning of much traditional healing centers on ancestor reverence.

Working your lines can be meditative, in and of itself. Concentration is an art.  When performing an ancestor meditation, people experience different things. You may find yourself meeting a specific person that you are aware of in your family history. Some people, however, meet their ancestors as archetypes. In other words, it may not be a specific individual you meet, but rather a symbol. Either way, understand that meeting these individuals is a gift. Pay attention to what they say and do — it may be that they’re trying to give you a message.


When properly respected, they are benevolent guardians. Our search is answered by initiation
: the blessing of the elders.  We need our specific stories heard, in the context of the universal, by someone who speaks both linear and symbolic languages.  Great assistance comes from the lineage of elders who have passed it on, and from the “hard wiring” of archetypal patterns inside us all.  The ancestors are eagerly waiting to help us, if we ask.

Many old stories talk about how the teachings are lost, again and again, and must be rediscovered by each generation, and reshaped into the words that can be heard in the world that generation inhabits. In honoring them, we honor the principles and values they represent. Thus we find the heavenly city inhabited by the mythic forefathers, the ancestors who constitute a genealogy of current names. These “genealogies” are not strictly historical, but mythic and symbolic. There is no reason, however, why they should be seen as standing in opposition to history. These “genealogical” names are steeped in a numerical, linguistic, astronomical, rhythmical, cyclic, and magical meaning.

The tomb is a symbol of the unconscious as well as an alchemical vessel in which transformation occurs. Jung related it to the womb, suggesting the tomb is a place of the past that connects us with our deceased ancestors, a place from which the psyche is born, a connector to our psychic background. The tomb also represents the completion of circle as a place where we will ultimately rejoin the ancestors once more.


An exploration of the ways in which the ancestors, from the archetypal to the personal, influence us in the present and implicate us in lives of subsequent generations.

Mending the Ancestral Web
The known and unknown stories of our ancestors are present in our personal symptoms, disposition, split loyalties, aspirations, and the questions which inform our lives. Our ancestral and cultural legacies continue living in our bodies, through our relationships, in both matter and the timelessness of psyche. These legacies root us in the past and implicate us in the lives of the generations that will follow.

The ancestors, from the archetypal to the personal, influence us tody.  If our ancestors managed to overcome a multitude of problems, such as severe illnesses, wars, loss of loved ones or severe economic declines, we who are genetically similar can successfully are reminded we can overcome a multitude of problems.

Many spiritual practices and religions – particularly in native cultures and Asia – revolve around both the acceptance and, in many cases, the worship of ancestors. Even in western cultures there is an increased tendency to include ancestor and archetypal relationship methods into various therapies and self-help programs.

The exploration and eventual acceptance of your family and ancestors is important for emotional and spiritual grounding. Depending on your memories and/or your family history, your ancestors can be a gateway to bliss . . . or a reminder of failure and limitation. Either way, and whether you like it or not, however, these folks are still your family.

On a biological level we are our ancestors. We have their DNA, their predispositions for certain illnesses, and so on.
The ancestors companion us and bequeath to us their unfinished business. Likewise on a spiritual level, we have their “stuff” – their stories, memories, emotions, energy, and even behavioral tendencies. We are their continuation . . . and also their current expression in the physical world.


You and your ancestors are one and the same. We are
psychologically pre-conditioned by our ancestors in history, who shaped our complexes, fears and obsessions. You possess the wisdom and intelligence to become a full human being because you inherited an eternity of wisdom, not only from your blood ancestors but also from the wholeness of life itself.

Even if you do not believe in the spiritual aspect of ancestry, you have probably witnessed the handing down of traditions, upbringing, and temperament from parent to child within your family tree. Some of these things are wonderfully empowering, wise, and nourishing. Some of these things are also painful, ignorant, and destructive.

Simply by accepting the power of family and ancestors, you can break the harmful cycles that have been handed down. You can begin to heal old wounds and free yourself from behaviors and emotions that no longer serve you. You can even discover the most liberating emotion of all – forgiveness.  Developing a strong relationship with your ancestors is profoundly important, second only to your relationship with yourself.

Jung felt very strongly that he was “under the influence of things or questions which were left incomplete and unanswered by [his] parents and grandparents and more distant ancestors.”  His differentiation of the collective unconscious into its various levels and his description of the nature of psyche provide a working model which allows us to see how our biography is part of a continuing story, part of a dynamic web of relations, which has its roots and telos in the stories of our ancestors and descendants.

“Everything psychic is pregnant with the future.” ~Carl Jung

For, in the last resort, we are conditioned not only by the past, but by the future, which is sketched out in us long beforehand and gradually evolves out of us. ~Jung, Analytical Psychology and Education, Page 110.

My soul — are you there? I have returned, I am here again. I have shaken the dust of all the lands from my feet, and I have come to you, I am with you. After long years of long wandering, I have come to you again.  Should I tell you everything I have seen, experienced, and drunk in? Or do you not want to hear about all the noise of life and the world? But one thing you must know: the one thing I have learned is that one must live this life. This life is the way, the long sought-after way to the unfathomable, which we call divine.
~Carl Jung; Red Book

Holy Blood, Holy Trail

•September 16, 2014 • Leave a Comment

http://jungiangenealogy.weebly.com/

A Mystery Wrapped in a Love Story
For those who can trace their ancestral lines back through centuries, the Grail Trail is a golden path back to medieval times, ancient times, & into the mists of myth and pre-history. Follow your Grail-Trail and see where it leads.

Ancestral Life Continues Within Us


Then turn to the dead, listen to their lament
and accept them with love.
” –C.G. Jung, The Red Book, Chapter XV

One of the key themes in ‘The Lament for the Dead’ is the denial of death by contemporary, secular Western culture. Our ancestors are not properly recognized and given their due weight – there is no real place for the dead in our culture.  Shamdasani says on p.176:
“The first task that Jung finds himself confronted with [as I think anyone engaged in this descent is] is reanimating the dead, acknowledging that the dead are, and they have presences, they have effects. We turn our eyes away from future-oriented living and to what has gone before, in the shape of animated history, history that is not simply a record but history that is active.”
Therefore, by denying the dead we are denying ourselves.


Jung believed
that the foundations of personality are ancestral and universal. Because much of genealogical best-practice includes mythic and fictional characters, the process is best approached with a Jungian orientation, rather than as hard historical fact, except where lines are clearly curated. In terms of collective unconscious, genealogy has “as if” psychic reality.

Jungian and post-Jungian practices allow us to interact with such material in a deeply meaningful way that helps us integrate such knowledge and self-knowledge, that enhances integration and individuation. Post-Jungians are committed to an approach that does not focus exclusively on psychic reality but also takes into account the realities of the outer world. Genealogy helps us adapt to both external or internal realities. This practice raises into conscious awareness what was formerly subconscious or unconscious — the lives of our direct ancestors.

Living Roots

•September 16, 2014 • Leave a Comment

http://jungiangenealogy.weebly.com

Grailcollage2

When I worked in my family tree, I understood the strange communion of the destiny that unites me to my ancestors.
–Jung

…who are the dead and what does it mean to answer them?
What matters is not what you say, but what they say back.

“The key to the Grail is compassion, ‘suffering with,’ feeling another’s sorrow as if it were your own. The one who finds the dynamo of compassion is the one who’s found the Grail.” –Joseph Campbell

Jungian Genealogy & the Ancestors

•September 12, 2014 • Leave a Comment

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Finding Deeper Meaning in Genealogy
Ancestors, Legends, & Myths
by Iona Miller, 2014


The ancestors are, of course, the archetypes — they are the psychological ancestors. In a really dangerous situation they may be quite real. –Jung

In psychology, an archetype is the innate knowledge, images, or ways of thinking that are inherited from ancestors. An event that might be an archetype is birth.
The gods are our spiritual ancestors, as our lines of descent show. The knowledge, but also the sins and wounds of our ancestors live within us.

We forget that the soul has its own ancestors. We relive the soul of the ancestors as primordial psyche, inherited from common ancestors in the distant human past. We can receive guidance in the dreamtime from archetypal ancestors. We do not only carry the genes of our ancestors; we also carry their memories. Jung said, Underneath the modern surface of the mind lurks the original primitive mentality of our ancestors, complete with vivid stories and symbols that have a natural appeal to us and seem to appear unbidden in our dreams and fantasies.

To conduct our own personal research and to find out for ourselves, maybe all we need to do is listen to our inner DNA. Listen to the voices, feelings, sights and experiences of our ancestors. The land of the dead is the country of our ancestors and the images who walk in on us are our ancestors. They can be associated with the elements of nature. They exert their claim on us, and power over us — a sense of our internal fate — as psychic representations of our geographical, historical and cultural contexts. The achievement of consciousness by our distant ancestors is reflected in the hero’s journey.

Legacy of the Ancestors

Ancestors brings together genealogy, common mythological roots and psychology.
Our ancestors often use metaphors in order to make the issue clear. The “living serpents” of our descent lines can be used to invoke the ancestors. Genealogy is a form of veneration. The study of our ancestors is the study of the Tree of Life. An altar, for example, can honor your biological ancestors, the universal archetypal ancestors, or both.

The purpose of the totem meal, grail, or eucharist is to reunite the participants with the life of their ancestors. Their lives, joys and fears are within us. In this way, they are with us always. For most of us it is true that we have lost touch with religious traditions of our ancestors;  that we no longer connect with their  sacred myths and metaphors. Genealogy is more direct, more personal.

Healing shifts occur through the conscious Feminine, Sophia, Wisdom, the divine feminine embodied in the world.  The exploits and mode of being of the great ancestors resonate, to a lesser degree, with our experience of dreaming.  The concealed and mysterious are as important as the revealed and understood. The ancestors are jealous; they want to be remembered. Remembering them is not just an empty custom, but imbued with meaning. The deeper meaning of much traditional healing centers on ancestor reverence.

When performing an ancestor meditation, people experience different things. You may find yourself meeting a specific person that you are aware of in your family history. Some people, however, meet their ancestors as archetypes. In other words, it may not be a specific individual you meet, but rather a symbol. Either way, understand that meeting these individuals is a gift. Pay attention to what they say and do — it may be that they’re trying to give you a message.


When properly respected, they are benevolent guardians. In honoring them, we honor the principles and values they represent.
The tomb is a symbol of the unconscious as well as an alchemical vessel in which transformation occurs. Jung related it to the womb, suggesting the tomb is a place of the past that connects us with our deceased ancestors, a place from which the psyche is born, a connector to our psychic background. The tomb also represents the completion of circle as a place where we will ultimately rejoin the ancestors once more.


An exploration of the ways in which the ancestors, from the archetypal to the personal, influence us in the present and implicate us in lives of subsequent generations.

Mending the Ancestral Web
The known and unknown stories of our ancestors are present in our personal symptoms, disposition, split loyalties, aspirations, and the questions which inform our lives. Our ancestral and cultural legacies continue living in our bodies, through our relationships, in both matter and the timelessness of psyche. These legacies root us in the past and implicate us in the lives of the generations that will follow.

The ancestors, from the archetypal to the personal, influence us in the present and implicate us in the lives of the generations that will follow.  If our ancestors managed to overcome a multitude of problems, such as severe illnesses, wars, loss of loved ones or severe economic declines, we who are genetically similar can successfully are reminded we can overcome a multitude of problems.
Thinking about ancestors, archetypes, mental forms and so on is simply another form of what we like to call magic
.

“Everything psychic is pregnant with the future.” ~Carl Jung

For, in the last resort, we are conditioned not only by the past, but by the future, which is sketched out in us long beforehand and gradually evolves out of us. ~Jung, Analytical Psychology and Education, Page 110.

My soul — are you there? I have returned, I am here again. I have shaken the dust of all the lands from my feet, and I have come to you, I am with you. After long years of long wandering, I have come to you again.  Should I tell you everything I have seen, experienced, and drunk in? Or do you not want to hear about all the noise of life and the world? But one thing you must know: the one thing I have learned is that one must live this life. This life is the way, the long sought-after way to the unfathomable, which we call divine.
~Carl Jung; Red Book

 
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